Tip #112: Too slick by half

Many reporters like taking notes on business cards. So resist spending extra money to get yours printed on glossy stock that we can’t write on.

PS: Yes, front and back.

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12 Comments

Filed under Common sense

12 responses to “Tip #112: Too slick by half

  1. Erin

    I’m sure I’ve missed something fundamental (I’ve only been doing PR for 23 years, after all), but especially in this day/age, why would a PR give you, a reporter, a business card at all? Just to prove she has one? Sounds like you get ’em foisted at you frequently!

  2. The world still exists exchanging bus cards… besides your name, its a great way to reinforce the corporate brand identity.

    Besides glossy cards (totally agree this is a pain and ensure the card is totally useless for writing on), the other “bad” thing is filling the back of the card with stuff (bullets, other info on company etc)… effectively “stealing” the white space on the back that is used to jot down quick notes about the person/conversation/encounter…

  3. @Erin, exchanging business cards is still a part of the social dynamic, like shaking hands. Also, they have contact info on them, which makes them genuinely useful.

    When I’m at an event meeting person after person, I collect a lot of cards. I keep them all together. After the event, I look through them to figure out my followups. Because everyone has a business card, I can generally count on this step to give me a complete and accurate picture of who I talked with.

    @Grant Wickes: You’d also be surprised how many people print a plain dark color on the back of their cards. Looks cool! Kills utility!

    • dave

      Made the “black back” mistake myself. I was the first to notice it, too, when I couldn’t write on my own card. That was a waste of money…

  4. I’m a reporter and I hated one year when CNET gave us black-backed business cards because I couldn’t take notes.

    @Erin, I still like business cards because they have the name spelled right and the title. Sure, you should have e-mailed it to me, too, but sometimes on deadline pulling that card out of my pocket is faster than searching for some e-mail thread.

  5. Aly

    This never occurred to me before. And makes perfect sense.

  6. You must *hate* Moo cards, eh?

  7. Moo cards are beautiful, but I do hate them, yes. Because when I pick up a stack of regular business cards, the Moos fall out.

    I also hate euro-sized business cards, plastic cards, fold-out cards, books-as-cards, etc. I make my living as a grouch, deal with it.

    I did once get a steel business card that could be used as a weapon in a pinch. I liked that.

    Oh, see also: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YBxeDN4tbk

    • Any bus cards adding twitter address yet? seems like a logical addition.

      @rafe agree with the Moo & other “fancy” cards — silly way to try and be different for a company… better to focus on memorable brand that is consistent with other marketing material in company, with a font type & size(s) that is easy-to-read and is well laid out on the front of card.

      Then, have the bus card printed on stock that’s a slightly heavier weight (with the back white and empty!)

  8. PB

    I’m sure I’ve missed something fundamental (I’ve only been doing PR for 23 years, after all), but especially in this day/age, why would a PR give you, a reporter, a business card at all? Just to prove she has one? Sounds like you get ’em foisted at you frequently!

  9. Pingback: Tip #173: Modernize your business cards | Pro PR Tips

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